Calendar of Upcoming Local Events

Welcome to Historic Vienna and the Freeman Store and Museum – there’s lots to see here.

Please explore this website by using the pull-downs and links.

Historic Vienna Inc. mailing address – P.O. Box 53, Vienna, VA 22183

Historic Vienna Quick Calendar: (please SCROLL DOWN to see details for events – also click link directly below for PDF)

Calendar of events 2018 Mar to Dec

HISTORIC VIENNA INK!!!  Click link NOW to read Fall 2017 Newsletter:

Historic Vienna INK – NEWSLETTER Fall 2017

The Ayr Hill Annual Plant sale is Saturday, May 12, from 9 am till 1 pm at the Freeman Store.  Stop by and get some great deals on locally grown plants from our gardeners, who do so much to beautify our town.

The 2018 Annual “Walk on the Hill” is scheduled this year for April 29, last Sunday of the month, 2-5 pm.

 2018 Walk on the hill PDF

In addition, there will be the annual Green Expo (by the Town of Vienna’s Community Enhancement Commission with local/regional earth-friendly exhibitors) and Ayr Hill Garden Club (Floral) showcases in the vicinity of Windover and Orchard Street. Together, it is an opportunity to share the ambience of this unique part of our town with the rest of the Vienna community, as well as out-of-town guests, many of them enthusiastically returning year after year. Be sure to invite all your friends and family of all ages to enjoy in this celebration.   Link to Town of Vienna site with event map: 

 https://www.viennava.gov/index.aspx?nid=840

In addition, there will be the annual Green Expo (by the Town of Vienna’s Community Enhancement Commission with local/regional earth-friendly exhibitors) and Ayr Hill Garden Club (Floral) showcases in the vicinity of Windover and Orchard Street. Together, it is an opportunity to share the ambience of this unique part of our town with the rest of the Vienna community, as well as out-of-town guests, many of them enthusiastically returning year after year. Be sure to invite all your friends and family of all ages to enjoy in this celebration.

In commemoration of the 100th anniversary of the end of World War I, Historic Vienna Inc.’s 2018 main exhibit, located on the second floor, is entitled Home Front – The Great War and Vienna.  The exhibit features information, images, models, and artifacts, including uniforms, equipment, and documents, from “the war  to end all wars.” The exhibit includes a diorama of the fearsome trenches that were ubiquitous on World War I battlefields as well as a graphic display of awards and decorations.

“Vienna didn’t have an awful lot to do with the war,” notes another HVI curator, Mike Berger. “Seventy-three men with a Vienna address fought in the war,” which the United States did not enter until 1917.  However, the names of two Vienna soldiers who lost their  lives in World War I will ring familiar to those living in the community today. The exhibit tells how George Dyer and Clarence Gunnell, for whom the local American Legion Post is named, lost their lives.

Women’s Suffrage exhibit has received another brand new look this year and is now focused on The Women’s Rights Movement through Cartoons.  The exhibit features more than 50 political cartoons and other images collected from newspapers, postcards and other publications from the 1850’s onward.

The cartoons focus on the right to vote as well as other women’s rights related to parental custody, property, employment and income, divorce, economic health of the family and birth control.

Annual exhibits related to the women’s rights movement will continue at the Freeman Store through 2020, which will mark the 100th anniversary of adoption of the Constitutional amendment allowing women to vote.

HVI’s USED BOOK CELLAR!!!  Help support our organization year round by purchasing a wonderful used book.  All profits to the operation of our store, museum and events.  Prices are marked very low so that we can sell more books and bring more funding in for exhibits, events and operations.

Historic Vienna, Inc. now offers hundreds of used books for sale year round in the Freeman Store. This on-going sale is conducted primarily from the cellar of the Freeman Store during store hours, Wednesday through Sunday, Noon to 4 PM. A large variety books are offered at very reasonable prices.

Beautiful gifts are always available at our store:

Carruth Studio Sculptures

Cavallini & Co Postcards

WWI Reproduction Postcards

 

Rachel Peden’s 2017 hand painted ornament of Vienna’s Green Hedges School.  We sell many of Rachel’s ornaments which can be displayed on a Christmas Tree or anywhere, anytime around the house!

Green Hedges 2017 HVI Ornament

Our beloved Vienna Train Mural printed in small scale on a coffee mug

Vienna Train Mural mug

 

Vintage Tea Towels – Cavallini & Company

Miss Match Hop Scotch Game

Please support Historic Vienna Inc. using Amazonsmile !

Amazon Smile LINK

When you purchase any eligible item on Amazon, 0.5% of the item price is donated to our 501c3 Non-profit organization.

The Latest . . . . Reading, Relaxing & Fun ideas are available at the Freeman Store.  Please drop by and make your summer happier with one of these items.

also  . . . . . . EXCELLENT Children’s books for sale in our store!

 Our Historic Vienna Inc. board, storekeepers and friends thank all of our supporters for helping us to have a very successful and exciting 2018 so far.  We look forward to serving our community again every year by sharing history and sponsoring events that will be enjoyable for all.

HVI Memberships are from January 1 to December 31. Please renew if you are a member or join our group in order to promote history and support Historic Vienna Inc. Annual Memberships: Individual – $20, Family – $25 & Group or Corporate – $35

VIENNA’S LITTLE LIBRARY celebrates 120 YEARS!  EVENT COMPLETED ON SATURDAY OCTOBER 14, 2017.

The one-room library building, now located on Mill Street in Vienna, was the Town’s first public library, constructed in 1897 by local resident Edward R. Pierce at Library Lane and Maple Avenue. It was moved in 1912 to Center Street and Maple Avenue, and in 1969 to its present location where it is maintained as a museum by Historic Vienna.

The celebration included remarks by local dignitaries and former Little Library patrons, presentation of proclamations honoring the anniversary, musical entertainment, games for children and adults, and souvenirs and refreshments for everyone.

Historic Vienna Inc. also honored the history of this beautiful and important building during this year’s Vienna Halloween Parade.

 

BEAUTIFUL 2016 Christmas cards by McLean, VA artist Erik Hottenstein:

Erik Hottenstein 2016 Freeman Store Christmas card

Erik Hottenstein 2016 Freeman Store Christmas card

Rachel Peden handcrafted ornament – – – VIENNA ARTS CENTER!

Vienna Arts Center 2016 Ornament

Vienna Arts Center 2016 Ornament

Dr. Robert Amsler receives Town of Vienna Volunteer Recognition award on April 18, 2017!

Congratulations to Dr. Amsler for this well deserved award.  “In honor of your service to the community as an outstanding volunteer who has generously and enthusiastically given your time and resources to assist others.”

Dr. Amsler Volunteer Award from Town of Vienna

 Report on the Little Library Research (Vienna, VA’s original library – built in 1897)

By Dr. Robert Amsler

While my effort to solve the mystery of what books are in the Little Library and how they are organized on the shelves started with the creation of spreadsheets of the catalog cards in the Biography and Non-Fiction drawers of the card catalog, it has since progressed to examining the actual books one by one and recording their bibliographic information directly. In part this was necessitated by the absence of copyright dates or publishers on the catalog cards, but also because I’ve discovered that the card catalog is not a complete inventory of the books catalogued in the Little Library.

Little Library 1950-51

The first thing one must get used to when dealing with the Little Library is Murphy’s Law. Whatever could go wrong, did go wrong at some point. We not only have catalog cards for books that cannot be found (as of yet), but there are books on the shelves that were indeed catalogued long ago for which there are no catalog cards. There are also uncatalogued books on the shelves that were donated to the Little Library after it closed (continuing the uninterrupted tradition of Vienna residents for well over 100 years of donating books for libraries).

Little Library Interior #1

Little Library Interior #1

The Little Library was truly the product of ‘folk librarianship’ in that unlike every library we have known about since being small children, the call numbers on its books are NOT the basis for where they are located on its shelves. The call numbers, many of which are still legible on the spines of the books as well as written inside the books are actually accession numbers. They aren’t based on any library classification system. They were totally invented and used just in the Vienna Little Library.

These call numbers give an alphabetic category code describing what section of the library the book should be shelved in, such as F for Adult Fiction, B for Biography, or JR for Junior (Children’s books), but then add a letter-number combination below that which represents the first letter of its author or a word from its title and then an integer to indicate how many times that letter has been used in that category. So, the first step in understanding the organization of the Little Library was the very unintuitive observation that the call numbers didn’t explain either specifically where the books would be placed on the shelves, how to reshelve them, or in general indicate a relationship between consecutive numbered books.

The second major discovery was that the card catalog doesn’t really contain alphabetic subject cards. The Little Library librarians always created cards for titles of books, usually for the authors of books, but created no index cards for the subjects of books. For books in the Biography (B) section, the books are alphabetized on two bookcases by what we expect to be their order in a contemporary library, by the ‘biographee’ (the person whose biography the book describes), but that may not be either the author or title of the book. For example, the 1952 biography, “Windows for the Crown Prince” by Elizabeth Gray Vining with call number B V-10 is shelved alphabetically under “AKIHITO” who was the subject of the biography. There are catalog cards for the author (“Vining…”) and for the title (“Windows…), but none for Akihito.

Little Library Interior #2

Little Library Interior #2

For children’s books things are perhaps more difficult, since as far as I can tell, there is no separation of non-fiction from fiction books; they are all shelved in one alphabetical order by their authors. The call numbers are of course something completely different.

Adult Fiction is perhaps the easiest to locate, having catalog cards by author and title, and being shelved alphabetically by authors and within authors by titles. Adult non-fiction is in two bookcases, subdivided into sections roughly by its category letters; but there was a good deal of indecision as to what ‘subject’ some of the non-fiction books belonged under. S (for Science), Bot (for Botany), and even a special shelf for books for the Vienna’s Ayr Hill Garden Club dealing with flowers, trees, shrubs and birds.

To facilitate working with the bookcases they have been given designations according to what wall of the library they touch: North, South, East, West and Center as well as numbering the bookcases from left-to-right and conceptually numbering the shelves from top-to-bottom and the books from left-to-right. And now, most of the bookcases also bear labels indicating what category of books they contain and the range of authors/biographees in that bookcase. The secrets of the books will require book-by-book examination of each one, for many surprises exist in individual volumes.

Note: the books in the collection, while old, are not valuable, as they have been ‘enjoyed’ by many readers over the years, and so are of little interest to book collectors.

The Marco Polo Building a part of life in Vienna   By Connie Stuntz

Because of the seemingly certain fate of Vienna’s Marco Polo building at 245 Maple Avenue West, this article I found in our collection of memories seems timely. It appeared in The Providence Journal, a popular weekly McLean newspaper edited by Richard Smith. His wife Louise Smith wrote “The Grapevine,” a neighborly society column enjoyed by much of Fairfax County.

In her December 7, 1954 column, she describes the interior of the Marco Polo in its first year when my husband Mayo and I hosted a holiday dance there:

The dance was held in the new Garden Room opened in Vienna during the past Fall by Mr. George Copp, and no more agreeable place could have been found. The building features a two-story, semi-circular bay window in the center of its façade. Behind the lower one on Saturday evening twinkled the lights of a Christmas tree. Coats were left below on ample racks, and one went to the second floor for dancing. 

At one end of the ballroom was a great raised fireplace, in which roared at first, and finally glowed, a cheerful fire. The walls have enough variety in finish to lend interest and a certain coziness not usually found in such large rooms. There is red brick, pine paneling, painted plaster, and a large expanse of scenic wallpaper.

We were pleased that George Copp had been inspired to build such a gathering place in Vienna. The spacious second floor room was perfect for the Christmas Dance for several hundred special friends and relations whom we wanted to entertain before our family left Vienna in early 1955 for Japan for several years.

As I’m writing this now, I’m thinking of all sorts of events I’ve attended at the Marco Polo Restaurant on the first floor, particularly Ayr Hill Garden Club May luncheons. They always had good food and plenty of parking. Until now I had not realized how much the 62 years of this building’s history meant to me.