Welcome to Historic Vienna Inc. and the Freeman Store & Museum

* IMPORTANT CLOSING NOTICE *
Thank you for your understanding
Important Closing Notice, March 2020


If you have questions or concerns please EMAIL US at historicviennava@gmail.com
We can respond much quicker through email vs phone messages.

As of March 24, and in accordance with the VA Governor’s announcement, many HVI events scheduled in 2020 are cancelled. Specifically, the Spring Membership meeting on 3/24, Appraisal Event on 5/1 and Afternoon Teas on May 15-16.

Thank you.

CALENDAR OF EVENTS 2020 – Historic Vienna Inc.

2020 Calendar

HISTORIC VIENNA INK Newsletter:
INK Spring 2020
INK Winter 2019
INK Fall 2019
INK Summer 2019
INK Spring 2019
INK Winter 2018
INK Fall 2018
INK Summer 2018
INK Spring 2018

2020 EXHIBITS: Vienna in the 1960’s
AND the Women’s Suffrage Movement – Where Are We Now?

Please enjoy our exhibits here online until we are able to reopen.

2020 EXHIBITS:
“Vienna in the 1960s”
All you hippies, flower children, bohemians, and mavericks prepare yourselves to flash back to the 1960s and its days of sit-ins, anti-war marches, and Woodstock. It’s been said that if you remember the ’60s, you weren’t there! Well, we hope that you were there and that you remember it and come visit our new exhibit. Listen to the music of the time and experience the fashion, the entertainment, the technology, the toys & games, and so much more.

2020 Exhibit: Vienna in the 1960s

















“Women’s Rights Movement”
Our continuing hall exhibit will focus on WHERE ARE WE NOW?
The fifth, and final, exhibit in the 5-year series of small exhibits on the history of the women’s rights movement will focus on where it stands today. It has been 100 years since women won the right to vote. While women have won many rights, they have not yet achieved full equality. This exhibit looks at our progress in many areas including economic, political, educational, sports, family and health.


PAST EXHIBITS:
2019 EXHIBITS:
“Vienna in the 1950s”
This period was a time of massive expansion in Vienna. We will show how our town changed and improved during those years as we highlight the decades’ rewards and challenges.
Our continuing exhibit on the “Women’s Suffrage Movement” will focus on
Women Creating a More Perfect Democracy: 100 Years of the League of Women Voters
2019 Exhibit: Vienna in the 1950s

2019 Exhibit: Vienna in the 1950’s

2019 Exhibit: Vienna in the 1950’s

2019 Exhibit: Vienna in the 1950’s

2019 Exhibit: Vienna in the 1950’s

2019 Exhibit: Vienna in the 1950’s

2019 Exhibit: Vienna in the 1950’s

2019 Exhibit: Vienna in the 1950’s

2019 Exhibit: Vienna in the 1950’s

2019 Exhibit: Vienna in the 1950’s

2019 Exhibit: Women Creating a More Perfect Democracy. 100 Years of the League of Women Voters

Women creating a more perfect Democracy. 100 Years of the League of Women Voters.

Women creating a more perfect Democracy. 100 Years of the League of Women Voters.

Women creating a more perfect Democracy. 100 Years of the League of Women Voters.


2018 EXHIBITS
In commemoration of the 100th anniversary of the end of World War I, Historic Vienna Inc.’s 2018 main exhibit, located on the second floor, is entitled Home Front – The Great War and Vienna.  The exhibit features information, images, models, and artifacts, including uniforms, equipment, and documents, from “the war  to end all wars.” The exhibit includes a diorama of the fearsome trenches that were ubiquitous on World War I battlefields as well as a graphic display of awards and decorations.

“Vienna didn’t have an awful lot to do with the war,” notes another HVI curator, Mike Berger. “Seventy-three men with a Vienna address fought in the war,” which the United States did not enter until 1917.  However, the names of two Vienna soldiers who lost their  lives in World War I will ring familiar to those living in the community today. The exhibit tells how George Dyer and Clarence Gunnell, for whom the local American Legion Post is named, lost their lives.

World War I exhibit

World War I exhibit

World War I exhibit

World War I exhibit

World War I exhibit

Women’s Suffrage exhibit has received another brand new look this year and is now focused on The Women’s Rights Movement through Cartoons.  The exhibit features more than 50 political cartoons and other images collected from newspapers, postcards and other publications from the 1850’s onward.

The cartoons focus on the right to vote as well as other women’s rights related to parental custody, property, employment and income, divorce, economic health of the family and birth control.

Annual exhibits related to the women’s rights movement will continue at the Freeman Store through 2020, which will mark the 100th anniversary of adoption of the Constitutional amendment allowing women to vote.

Please learn more about Historic Vienna’s Women’s Suffrage exhibits by clicking on the links below.  VERY detailed information is available in these two Adobe Acrobat PDFs which include all the information displayed during our first two exhibits at the Freeeman Store and Museum.

HVI Origins of Women’s Rights Exhibit 1

HVI The Women’s Rights Movement in 1917 Exhibit 2

 

Suffrage Exhibit

Suffrage Exhibit

Please support Historic Vienna Inc. using Amazonsmile !

Amazon Smile LINK

When you purchase any eligible item on Amazon, 0.5% of the item price is donated to our 501c3 Non-profit organization.

HVI Memberships are from January 1 to December 31. Please renew if you are a member or join our group in order to promote history and support Historic Vienna Inc. Annual Memberships: Individual – $25, Family – $30 & Group or Corporate – $40

The Marco Polo Building a part of life in Vienna   By Connie Stuntz

Because of the seemingly certain fate of Vienna’s Marco Polo building at 245 Maple Avenue West, this article I found in our collection of memories seems timely. It appeared in The Providence Journal, a popular weekly McLean newspaper edited by Richard Smith. His wife Louise Smith wrote “The Grapevine,” a neighborly society column enjoyed by much of Fairfax County.

In her December 7, 1954 column, she describes the interior of the Marco Polo in its first year when my husband Mayo and I hosted a holiday dance there:

The dance was held in the new Garden Room opened in Vienna during the past Fall by Mr. George Copp, and no more agreeable place could have been found. The building features a two-story, semi-circular bay window in the center of its façade. Behind the lower one on Saturday evening twinkled the lights of a Christmas tree. Coats were left below on ample racks, and one went to the second floor for dancing. 

At one end of the ballroom was a great raised fireplace, in which roared at first, and finally glowed, a cheerful fire. The walls have enough variety in finish to lend interest and a certain coziness not usually found in such large rooms. There is red brick, pine paneling, painted plaster, and a large expanse of scenic wallpaper.

We were pleased that George Copp had been inspired to build such a gathering place in Vienna. The spacious second floor room was perfect for the Christmas Dance for several hundred special friends and relations whom we wanted to entertain before our family left Vienna in early 1955 for Japan for several years.

As I’m writing this now, I’m thinking of all sorts of events I’ve attended at the Marco Polo Restaurant on the first floor, particularly Ayr Hill Garden Club May luncheons. They always had good food and plenty of parking. Until now I had not realized how much the 62 years of this building’s history meant to me.